Northwest_Coast_Native_Bentwood_Box_Cedar_Steam_Bent_Haida_Style_01_yojn

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
This is a new, steam-bent box by Cree/Metis First Nations artist James Michels. Created using Red Cedar, this box measures 6″ x 4 1/4″ x 4 1/4 and has been painted with a’ Split Eagle’ design. It is also available with a’ Bent Box Bear’ design or’ Double Frog’ design, as shown. When mortuary boxes, canoe boxes, regalia chests, etc are steam-bent, the surface that is actually bent after kerfing is only 1-2 millimeters thick. There is only one seam, which is epoxied and sealed by James. James began his carving career in 1994, shortly after working as a carpenter. He now specializes in making bentwood cedar boxes, and carving and painting them in the Northwest Coast style. James also creates panels and works on commission, and many of his pieces contain inlays of abalone. One of his commissions involved the creation of custom bent boxes for the participants of the 2005 PGA Golf Skins Game in Whistler, BC. James apprenticed with Coast Salish artist Joe Campbell, with whom he learned design, carving and painting techniques. James also cites Carrier artist Larry Rosso as a source of inspiration. Please note that the Red Cedar lids and bases may be slightly different shades than the shade depicted in the photo. Indicate if you would like painted or unpainted lid and base upon checkout. Each box is signed by the artist. Boxes can be made with custom dimensions upon request. Bentwood boxes are unique to the Northwest Coast First Nations peoples of British Columbia. Traditionally, bentwood boxes were used for symbolic and practical purposes. The large chests with elaborate designs were often presented to honored guests during feasts or potlatches. They were also used as burial boxes for ancestors. More simply designed boxes were used for storage of clothing and household items, for transporting goods, cooking and to display important carvings. The design represented the clans and showed the rank, social status, individual wealth and spiritual power of the owner. They also portrayed legends or events in history. These boxes were prized by families and passed down to succeeding generations. “Haida art”, “first nations”, “NWC”, “indian art”, “animal urn”. The item “Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style” is in sale since Friday, June 20, 2014. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Native American\ US\1935-Now\Sculptures”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Country of Manufacture: Canada
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Artisan: James Michels
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Origin: British Columbia
  • Tribal Affiliation: Cree

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style