Category Archives: northwest

Northwest_Coast_Coast_Haida_Artist_Freda_Diesing_Artist_Proof_1978_Native_Art_01_zce

Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art

Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art

Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Freda Diesing was a Haida artist from Prince Rupert, BC. She was given the Haida name Skil Kew Wat, magical little woman, a name that reflects the influence and power of her talent. One of the first female carvers on the modern northwest coast, Freda began her carving career at the age of 42. She studied at the Vancouver School of Art and at the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art at Ksan Village. In the 1960s, Diesing and a handful of other artists were responsible for the re-awakening of Northwest Coast art and culture. She worked with other master artists including Robert Davidson, Dempsey Bob, and Tony Hunt. In the 1980s, her work was included in the ground breaking exhibition Legacy – Tradition and Innovation in Northwest Coast Indian Art, assembled by the Royal British Columbia Museum, and exhibited internationally, bringing awareness and appreciation to her cultures art and history to the world. Diesing was an exceptional carver, teacher and mentor. Her students include many of the most acclaimed artists working in First Nations art today. She generously contributed many works of art to local communities. In 2000, she was awarded an honorary diploma from Coast Mountain College (formerly Northwest Community College). In 2002, she received a National Aboriginal Achievement Award and an honorary doctorate from the University of Northern British Columbia. “Raven Inside the Whale”. Signed in pencil Freda Diesing. Measurements: 23 X 17 1/2 inches. Condition: Good condition: 5 minor folds in paper; the top of AP is slightly rumpled, and there is discoloration around the edges from being in a frame for years. Thank you for looking and please follow my store as new art is added often. The item “Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art” is in sale since Friday, October 2, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “vssport” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to United States, all countries in Europe, Canada.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Culture: Canadian Aboriginal
  • Artisan: Freda Diesing
  • Tribal Affiliation: Haida

Northwest Coast Coast Haida Artist Freda Diesing Artist Proof 1978 Native Art
Northwest_Native_American_Cedar_Hand_Carved_Paddle_60_Long_Haida_Raven_Design_01_pd

Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design

Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design

Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
This listing is for one new, hand-carved, Red Cedar paddle by First Nations Northwest Coast Native artist, Ross Henderson. Great hung vertically or horizontally, these paddles fit in those awkward areas: above doorways, on narrow walls, behind the couch. Two hung together horizontally looks really great! Each paddle measures 60″ long by 6″ wide and there are three designs available. Each paddle is made to order and may differ slightly from the images included here. Raven – A symbol of transformation and creation, the raven is a primary crest symbol in Northwest Coast Native culture School of Salmon – A symbol of the life cycle, there is no better gift for those fishermen/sailors/swimmers in your life when considering the significance of the paddle and salmon. Eagle – A symbol of friendship and pride, this design is quintessentially Vancouver Island and will “pop” on any wall. Cougar – A symbol of assertiveness and tenacity. Bear – A symbol of knowledge and teaching. Born in 1970, Ross resides in Fort Rupert, BC. As a teenager he was influenced by his brother, Jonathan Henderson. He works with Kwakwakawakw artist Trevor Hunt and has been seriously carving since 2002. He works in a traditional Kwakwaka’wakw style and enjoys carving masks, Hamat’sa masks and paddles. He prides himself on his clean lines and knowledge of Kwakiutl design. Keywords: “Haida mask”, “Haida Jewelry”, “totem pole”, “pacific northwest”, “wall hanging”. The item “Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design” is in sale since Saturday, July 5, 2014. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to United States, all countries in Europe, Japan, Canada.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Country of Manufacture: Canada
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Culture: Canadian Aboriginal
  • Artisan: Ross Henderson
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Tribal Affiliation: Kwakwaka’wakw

Northwest Native American Cedar Hand-Carved Paddle 60 Long Haida Raven Design
Northwest_Native_Owl_Wall_Carving_Hand_Carved_and_Signed_01_zex

Northwest Native Owl Wall Carving Hand-Carved and Signed

Northwest Native Owl Wall Carving Hand-Carved and Signed

Northwest Native Owl Wall Carving Hand-Carved and Signed
This is an elegant hand-carved and painted yellow cedar’Owl’ wall carving by shop member and First Nations artist Matthew Baker. Each plaque is carved to order and will look slightly different from the image depicted. Each plaque measures approximately 15″ x 6″ and is signed. The Northwest Coast of North America is home to three species of owl: the great horned owl, the screech owl and the snowy owl. The owl is a nocturnal hunting bird. Although it is silent and rarely seen, owls are fierce hunters and possess a sharp, distinct call. Similar to many cultures around the world, the owl represents wisdom and perception on the Northwest Coast. In some cultures within British Columbia, an owl seen flying overhead can be interpreted as a warning or a foreshadowing of major events to come. It is a mysterious creature. Owl is fairly uncommon in Northwest Coast art. It is most frequently depicted in the art of the Gitksan people, for whom owl is a family crest symbol. Artistically, owls can be identified by large eyes, a short and hooked beak, and pointed ears, which can be exaggerated to emphasize the animals acute hearing. “Owl carving”, “native owl”, “haida owl”, “owl totem”. The item “Northwest Native Owl Wall Carving Hand-Carved and Signed” is in sale since Wednesday, January 6, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Culture: Canadian Aboriginal
  • Artisan: Matthew Baker
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Tribal Affiliation: Salish

Northwest Native Owl Wall Carving Hand-Carved and Signed
Northwest_Coast_Native_Art_Haida_Sterling_Silver_Eagle_Pendant_01_rhwe

Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant

Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant
Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant

Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant
This is a Haida Sterling Silver Eagle pendant hand carved by Clayton Gladstone (Jr). Gladstone was born and raised in Skidegate, B. Belongs to the Tsaahl (Eagle) clan. Gladstone’s parents Gladys & Clayton Gladstone. Very determined to start carving with not knowing how to sharpen and use tools. Growing up on Haida Gwaii Gladstone had many well known mentors such as the famous and late Bill Reid, Gordon Cross, and many many more. Gladstone currently works on mainly sterling silver, gold and sometimes wood. Will fit chains up to 1/4+. The item “Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant” is in sale since Thursday, August 13, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “smits_29″ and is located in Queen Charlotte, British Columbia. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Featured Refinements: Haida Art
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Culture: Canadian Aboriginal
  • Artisan: Clayton Gladstone
  • Tribal Affiliation: Haida

Northwest Coast Native Art (Haida) Sterling Silver Eagle Pendant
Northwest_Native_Haida_Glass_Salad_Bowl_Orca_Whales_01_mhbc

Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales

Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales
Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales

Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales
Designed by Haida artist Michael Forbes Skilagiiwaas, this etched glass bowl is both decorative and practical. Made in Canada and measuring 5 3/4″ tall with a 11″ diameter, this is a stunning addition to any kitchen. Mike’s families are the Stanley family from Massett and the Alexander family from Haidaburg. Michael has been sketching and drawing since he was a child; his first inspiration coming from a visit to Skidegate where he witnessed a pole raising. Michaels artwork is featured throughout BC; notably, his work is displayed in the traditional longhouses of the Fraser Valley. He owns the company Silver Lining Studio which produces etched glass products. “Native american bowl”, “native glass bowl”, “haida bowl”, “orca bowl”. The item “Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales” is in sale since Wednesday, June 5, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Artisan: Mike Forbes
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Tribal Affiliation: Haida
  • Occasion: Wedding

Northwest Native Haida Glass Salad Bowl Orca Whales
Northwest_Coast_Native_American_Dragonfly_Pendant_01_uqak

Northwest Coast Native American Dragonfly Pendant

Northwest Coast Native American Dragonfly Pendant

Northwest Coast Native American Dragonfly Pendant
Created by Canadian First Nations artist Val Malesku, this sterling silver Dragonfly pendant is both delicate and detailed. Measuring 1 inch tall by 1.5 inches wide, this piece displays a fusion of natural realism and Northwest Indigenous formline design. The dragonfly is an element of the air, and is a symbol of change. It appears in some cultures as a crest symbol, and it also appears in shamanic contexts. Amongst the Haida, the Dragonfly is the only crest symbol that is an insect. Dragonfly is identified by its large eyes, double wings and prominent thorax. In some depictions, Dragonfly is seen with a proboscis, like Butterfly. Dragonflies are fast and elegant, and are often used as a symbol for dynamism and transition. Val Malesku has traveled throughout BC, and has been living on Haida Gwaii since the 1970s. She has been a carver and painter, and began working in silver and gold in 1981. Val apprenticed with renowned Haida artist Bill Reid. Her unique designs combine the classic with contemporary in Cree and Northwest Coast styles. In 2005, she was featured in the Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 2 exhibition at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, NY. In 2013, Val released her first limited edition print, and in 2014, she released two open edition prints. “Dragonfly totem”, “native dragonfly”, “dragonfly spirit”, “silver dragonfly”, “native american dragonfly”. The item “Northwest Coast Native American Dragonfly Pendant” is in sale since Wednesday, June 5, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Canada\ Aboriginal”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Artisan: Val Malesku
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Tribal Affiliation: Cree

Northwest Coast Native American Dragonfly Pendant
Northwest_Coast_Native_Bentwood_Box_Cedar_Steam_Bent_Haida_Style_01_yojn

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
This is a new, steam-bent box by Cree/Metis First Nations artist James Michels. Created using Red Cedar, this box measures 6″ x 4 1/4″ x 4 1/4 and has been painted with a’ Split Eagle’ design. It is also available with a’ Bent Box Bear’ design or’ Double Frog’ design, as shown. When mortuary boxes, canoe boxes, regalia chests, etc are steam-bent, the surface that is actually bent after kerfing is only 1-2 millimeters thick. There is only one seam, which is epoxied and sealed by James. James began his carving career in 1994, shortly after working as a carpenter. He now specializes in making bentwood cedar boxes, and carving and painting them in the Northwest Coast style. James also creates panels and works on commission, and many of his pieces contain inlays of abalone. One of his commissions involved the creation of custom bent boxes for the participants of the 2005 PGA Golf Skins Game in Whistler, BC. James apprenticed with Coast Salish artist Joe Campbell, with whom he learned design, carving and painting techniques. James also cites Carrier artist Larry Rosso as a source of inspiration. Please note that the Red Cedar lids and bases may be slightly different shades than the shade depicted in the photo. Indicate if you would like painted or unpainted lid and base upon checkout. Each box is signed by the artist. Boxes can be made with custom dimensions upon request. Bentwood boxes are unique to the Northwest Coast First Nations peoples of British Columbia. Traditionally, bentwood boxes were used for symbolic and practical purposes. The large chests with elaborate designs were often presented to honored guests during feasts or potlatches. They were also used as burial boxes for ancestors. More simply designed boxes were used for storage of clothing and household items, for transporting goods, cooking and to display important carvings. The design represented the clans and showed the rank, social status, individual wealth and spiritual power of the owner. They also portrayed legends or events in history. These boxes were prized by families and passed down to succeeding generations. “Haida art”, “first nations”, “NWC”, “indian art”, “animal urn”. The item “Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style” is in sale since Friday, June 20, 2014. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Native American\ US\1935-Now\Sculptures”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Country of Manufacture: Canada
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Artisan: James Michels
  • Provenance: Ownership History Available
  • Origin: British Columbia
  • Tribal Affiliation: Cree

Northwest Coast Native Bentwood Box Cedar Steam-Bent Haida Style
Northwest_Coast_Native_Cedar_Panel_Wall_Hanging_18_Haida_Colours_01_mp

Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours

Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours
Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours

Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours
Hand-carved by Canadian First Nations artist James Michels, this bold yet elegant panel depicts an. And measures 18 in diameter. Made from British Columbia Red Cedar 2 thick, this striking wall hanging looks especially good against white and cream coloured walls. James is one of the only Native American artists working in the Pacific Northwest to fill the negative space of his pieces with a delicate stippling , as can be seen in the detail above. The Eagle is a symbol of friendship and pride within most Native communities on West Coast. The image depicts a panel that James finished recently. Your panel will be made-to-order and will look extremely similar. Please enquire if interested in something larger. James began his carving career in 1994, shortly after working at a log home company. He now specializes in making steam bent cedar boxes, and carving and painting them in Northwest Coast style. James also creates panels and works on commission, and many of his pieces contain inlays of abalone. One of his commissions involved the creation of custom bent boxes for the participants of the 2005 PGA Golf Skins Game in Whistler, BC. James apprenticed with Coast Salish artist Joe Campbell, with whom he learned design, carving and painting techniques. James also cites Carrier artist Larry Rosso as a source of inspiration. In July of 2008, James created a large bentwood box entitled The Mendl Gathering which was commissioned through the Royal Bank of Canada. It measured 32 x 25 x 22 and contained abalone inlays and operculum shells. “Haida art”, “bentbox”, “bentwood”, “Robert Davidson”, “totem pole”, “tribal mask”. The item “Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours” is in sale since Tuesday, February 19, 2019. This item is in the category “Home & Garden\Home D├ęcor\Sculptures & Figurines”. The seller is “artfromabove” and is located in Vancouver, British Columbia. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, Japan, Australia.
  • Brand: “Handmade”
  • Country of Manufacture: Canada
  • Non-Domestic Product: No
  • Modified Item: No
  • Customized: Yes
  • Subject: Eagle
  • Type: Sculpture
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Canada
  • Style: Aboriginal
  • Material: Wood
  • Mounting: Wall Mounted
  • Color: Blacks
  • Theme: Animals

Northwest Coast Native Cedar Panel Wall Hanging 18 Haida Colours